Sacrifice With St. Therese {Free Printable!}

I have lots of sacrifice ideas for Catholic kids here. There’s the sacrifice crown of thorns, the sacrifice beans, the sacrifice beads… what am I forgetting? So why, do you ask, have I designed yet another sacrifice device for Catholic kids? Well… first of all, teaching the concept of making sacrifices is very needed, and something our society teaches us to avoid at all costs. So it’s important to me. Secondly, I don’t much care for doing to same things over and over. I like to try new things, which is what makes me such a good fit for writing a blog. So without further adieu, a new printable! Sacrifice with St. Therese.

sacrifice with st. therese activity for kids- free printable

Best part about this Sacrifice With St. Therese Pack? It’s free for subscribers! You’ll find the download on the Subscriber Bonus Page. If you’re currently reading this in an email because you’re already an email subscriber, you’ll find the link at the bottom of the email. If you are not yet a subscriber, you can become one by entering your email address with the link below. That way, you’ll always be updated when I come out with a new craft or printable! You’ll receive an email with the subscriber bonuses link the next time I put a new post on Catholic Icing.

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I’d just like to interject here that when I teach children about making sacrifices, I always use the phrase “sacrifice” and “good deed” together. I’ve found that this helps children to understand better. For instance, giving someone your cookie is a good deed, but it is a sacrifice on your part. These things tend to go hand-in-hand.

St. Therese is an amazing Saint (and Violet’s patron name Saint) so I like to make sure I keep her in the mix of things. This printable has 2 separate St. Therese quotes about sacrifice that you can choose from. The kids can color it themselves.

st. therese free printable coloring

st. therese printable coloring

These can be glued to a box or container of any kind. We used an empty oatmeal container covered in construction paper.

st. therese printable for free

I created these printables to help my children understand that they can offer up their joys, works, pains, and sufferings with joy. (Read- I’m trying to teach the whining out of my kids.) 😉

st. therese sacrifice printable

I’m not exactly sure where this little prayer came from. My mom taught it to me. She said the nuns at her Catholic school taught it to her. I couldn’t find it exactly anywhere, but I sure do love it. (You can replace the word “pain” with day, work, joy, or prayer.)

I offer up this pain to you

in all I think or say or do.

And I am united with all that was done

by Jesus Christ, your dearest son.

sacrifice printable for catholic kids

My Sacrifice With St. Therese pack has several versions of these little prayer cards for kids. They can either write in their prayer, or draw a picture if they’re too young to write.

printable prayers for catholic kids

I also made a printable list of ideas for prayer intentions. I find that lists like this really help get the wheels in kid’s heads turning. Lydia folded an origami cup for us to hold the blank cards, and we glued the prayer intention list to the front of it.

prayer intentions for catholic kids- free printable

After you’ve filled out your prayer card, you fold it and drop it in the container! (I think a tissue box would also work great for this, btw!)

sacrifice jar

Yep, it made it all the way in there.

sacrifice prayer jar

st. therese prayer container

Yep, that one made it in there, too. 😉

prayer box for kids

If your kids are learning about St. Therese, don’t forget to check out my other resources!

saint therese printable craft

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Comments

  1. Lacy,
    We learned the prayer as a daily morning prayer:
    Dear Lord,
    I offer You today,
    All I do and think and say;
    Uniting it with what was done
    On Earth by Jesus Christ, Thy Son. Amen.

    God bless you today and always,
    Ruth

  2. Thank you for the printable and ideas! I am tweaking a bit to make it work for the whole family. For older kids/teens (and adults!) many sacrifices are private so I think they might balk at writing it down. I’m printing out a lot of paper roses so that they can slip one in the canister for each sacrifice. On Holy Saturday I’ll count them up and buy that many roses to decorate the house with for Easter. 🙂

  3. I love this! What a beautiful practice as we go into Lent and beyond. We will definitely be incorporating this into our family life, beginning tomorrow, Ash Wednesday. I was just curious how your family follows this practice. For example, do you encourage your children to offer up sacrifices/good deeds multiple times each day? Or do you focus on one sacrifice/deed a day? I suppose it depends on ages of the children as well. Thanks for sharing and God bless!

    • Honestly, this is something I started in the Fall when my kids were being super whiney about everything. Whenever they would start to whine, I would send them to the Sacrifice box instead. So this really is a good activity outside of Lent, this just seemed like a good time to write about it. I think it would be a good idea to set a goal for a number of sacrifices per day. St. Therese used to use sacrifice beads with 10 beads to encourage herself to make sacrifices. It could certainly be adjusted for the age of the child.

  4. Er, I just realized that rose idea of mine could get expensive very quickly, lol. Maybe I’ll make them rose petals…. 12 petals equals a rose or something….

  5. Thank you so much for sharing all your creative work with us, Lacy!

  6. I really like this prayer and plan to incorporate it into our family practice. But I keep thinking about the part of the prayer, “And I am united with all that was done
    by Jesus Christ…”

    I wonder if “with” the right preposition?

    Is my sacrifice an offering and part of the “refining fire” Isaiah 48:10? Or am I equating my sacrifice as a form of redemption for others with the suffering of Jesus? I recently read the writings of St. Therese and am struggling to understand this point. Thanks. Recommendations for further reading appreciated.

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