How To Make Easter Story Cookies {With a Printable Recipe!}

Check out all of my faith-based Easter crafts and recipies for kids here!

Making Easter Story Cookies is a fun way to celebrate the true meaning of Easter with your kids! It’s become a tradition at our house on Holy Saturday, so I wanted to share the recipe with all of you. This post has full directions and a picture tutorial for making the cookies.

Each ingredient in this recipe is symbolic of a part of the Easter story, and goes with a coorilating Bible verse. I made a printable version of this recipe that includes all the bible verses right on the recipe. This way, you don’t have to drag your bible or your laptop into the kitchen to be covered in raw eggs. ;-) This free download is available to all of those who subscribe to Catholic Icing.  (Read more about how to access subscriber bonuses, like this one.)

Easter Story Cookies Recipe

Ingredients Needed:

  • 1 cup whole pecans
  • 1 tsp vinegar
  • 3 egg whites
  • Pinch of salt
  • 1 cup sugar

Other Supplies Needed:

  • Zipper baggie (gallon sized)
  • Wooden Spoon
  • Tape

Preheat your oven to 300 degrees F.  (This is very important!) Place your pecans inside your zipper baggie. Read John 19: verses 1 and 3

“Then Pilate took Jesus and scourged him. They came up to him saying, ‘Hail, King of the Jews!’ and struck him with their hands.”

Let your children take turns beating the pecans into small pieces with your wooden spoon.

Next, take out the vinegar and let all the children smell it. Explain to them that when Jesus was thirsty on the cross, this is what they offered him to drink. Read John 19: 28-30

“After this Jesus… said , ‘I thirst.’ A bowl of vinegar stood there; so they put a sponge full of the vinegar on hyssop and held it to his mouth. When Jesus had received the vinegar, he said, “it is finished”; and he bowed his head and gave up his spirit.”

Add the egg whites. Explain to your children that eggs represent life. Then tell them that Jesus gave his life for each and every one of us. Read John 10: 10-11

“The thief comes only to steal and kill and destroy; I came that they may have life, and have it abundantly. I am the good shepherd. The good shepherd lays down his life for the sheep.”

Next, let put a tiny bit of salt on each of your children’s hands, and let them taste it. Tell them that this salt represents the salty tears of Jesus’ followers that loved him very much. Read Luke 23:27

And there followed him a great multitude of the people, and of women who bewailed and lamented him.“

Let the children hold their hands out again, and this time, give them each a taste of the sugar. Tell them that this is the sweet part of the story because Jesus died for our sins because he loves us! Read John 3:16

“For God so loved the world that he gave his only Son, that whoever believes in him should not perish but have eternal life.”

Beat the mixture with your mixer on high.

Keep beating on high for 12-15 minutes or until still peaks form. The mixture is now pure white.

Explain to your children that this symbolizes Jesus’ purity because Jesus never sinned. Read John 3:1-3

“Come now, let us reason together, says the LORD: though your sins are like scarlet, they shall be as white as snow; though they are red like crimson, they shall become like wool.”

Fold in the beaten pecans.

Drop by the teaspoon full onto a cookie sheet coverd with wax paper.

Tell your children that these lumpy mounds represent the tomb where Jesus’ body was laid. Read Matthew 27:58-60

“He went to Pilate and asked for the body of Jesus. Then Pilate ordered it to be given to him. And Joseph took the body, and wrapped it in a clean linen shroud, and laid it in his own new tomb, which he had hewn in the rock; and he rolled a great stone to the door of the tomb, and departed.”

Put the cookies in the oven, and turn the oven OFF!

Give each child a piece of tape to “seal” the oven. Read Matthew 27:65

“Pilate said to them, ‘You have a guard of soldiers; go, make it as secure as you can.’ So they went and made the sepulchre secure by sealing the stone and setting a guard.”

Explain how the disciples were in despair to leave Jesus’ body in the tomb. Explain to your children that you must leave your cookies in the sealed oven overnight, even if it makes them feel sad. Read John 16:20 and 22, then go to bed.

“Truly, truly, I say to you, you will weep and lament, but the world will rejoice; you will be sorrowful, but your sorrow will turn into joy. So you have sorrow now, but I will see you again and your hearts will rejoice, and no one will take your joy from you.”

Open the oven on Easter morning! Your cookies are hollow, just like Jesus’ tomb was on Easter morning!

Read Matthew 28:6 and eat your cookies!

“He is not here; for he has risen, as he said. Come, see the place where he lay.”

We really enjoy these Easter Story Cookies, and enjoy eating them every Easter morning! :-)

Again, for your printable version of this recipe, just check out the special page I have exclusively for Catholic Icing subscribers.  (Read more about how to access subscriber bonuses, like this one.)

More Meaningful Easter Activities for Children:

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Check out all of my faith-based Easter crafts and recipies for kids here!

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Comments

  1. This past week I helped the kids in my daughter’s preschool class make the Resurrection rolls. My daughter keeps telling everyone about them! I think we might have to make them again when Grandma and Grandpa get here for Easter.

  2. Belinda says:

    What if you’re not on Facebook? How can I get a copy of the recipe to do with my Godchildren?

  3. We love these too, Lacy! Just wanted to wish you a beautiful and blessed Holy Week! Thank you for all you share and do:)

  4. We’ve made these a few times. Yummy! Here are two tips: Make sure your oven is all the way heated and don’t make them too big! Last year they were too big and were a bit ‘raw’.

  5. That´s a nice recipe and for sure I´ll try it.
    I´m here to ask for your authorization to post the Portuguese version of the recipe in my blog, of course referencing yours.

    Thanks for sharing so many beautiful things.
    Ju

    • Sure! This recipe is actually all over the place. No idea who actually started this tradition. As long as you type it up in your own words, there shouldn’t be any problems with using it. :-)

  6. I’m a little slow… do I add the vinegar to the recipe? or is it just to understand?

  7. Lindsay H says:

    Do you have a good idea for a substitute for the pecans? We are allergic to nuts in our house but I love the symbolism! I have made these with chocolate chips, maybe a big chocolate bar crushed into chunks?

  8. This is such a great idea! I think I’ll start a new Easter tradition with this one!

  9. Can these be made and eat them the same day or do they have to set in the oven over night? Can they be made in a toaster oven? I would like to do this for my Sunday school class and we dont have a oven in our class room.

    • I haven’t tried them in a toaster oven, but you could do a trial run. Baking them the day before is not a problem.

  10. I let the oven cool down completely ( a few hours) and they’re set and ready to eat. I don’t think a toaster oven would stay warm enough when turn off to do the job.

  11. Hi Lacy,
    Just found your blog, looking for some ideas for my middle school SS. I LOVE it. But we have serious tree nut allergies. Could i use chocolate chips? If doing with kids, could they break up chocolate bars?
    peace

  12. These look fantastic. I will be trying these with my children this Holy Saturday!